Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla

Don Miguel Gregorio Antonio Ignacio Hidalgo-Costilla y Gallaga Mandarte Villaseñor (8 May 1753  – 30 July 1811), more commonly known as Don Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla or simply Miguel Hidalgo, was a Mexican Catholic priest and a leader of the Mexican War of Independence.

He was a professor at the Colegio de San Nicolás Obispo in Valladolid and was ousted in 1792. He served in a church in Colima and then in Dolores, Guanajuato. After his arrival, he was shocked by the poverty he found. He tried to help the poor by showing them how to grow olives and grapes, but in Mexico, growing these crops was discouraged or prohibited by the authorities due to Spanish imports of the items. In 1810 he gave the famous speech, "The Cry of Dolores", calling upon the people to protect the interest of their King Fernando VII (held captive by Napoleon) by revolting against the European-born Spaniards who had overthrown the Spanish Viceroy.

He marched across Mexico and gathered an army of nearly 90,000 poor farmers and Mexican civilians who attacked and killed both Spanish Peninsulares and Criollo elites, even though Hidalgo's troops lacked training and were poorly armed. These troops ran into a clan of 6,000 well-trained and armed Spanish troops; most fled or were killed at the Battle of Calderón Bridge on 17 January 1811. Hidalgo was executed by a firing squad on 30 July 1811 at Chihuahua, Chihuahua.

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‘Mapping Fiction,’ at the Huntington, explores novels’ landscapes, invented and real

The Los Angeles Times 19 Jan 2022
Joyce’s urban landscape was one he never wanted to map — at least not visually ... Advertisement. Octavia E ... Rare book fans can also find maps in early editions of Miguel de Cervantes‘ “El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quixote de la Mancha” (“The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha”) and Jonathan Swift’s “Gulliver’s Travels.”. Books ... Drawing on Octavia E....

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